Fidelity and anticipation

File:Montreal - Plateau, day of snow - 200312.jpgWatching for the Morning of December 31, 2017

Year B

The Sunday in Christmas

Fidelity. The Sunday in Christmas shows us more of the faithful in Israel: Joseph and Mary fulfilling all that the law requires. Simeon and Anna waiting for the fulfillment of God’s promise. But even now the texts begin to move towards Epiphany. “The nations shall see your vindication, and all the kings your glory,” says the prophet – and though the prophet is speaking of the restoration of Jerusalem, all the nations shall see God’s saving work. Righteousness and praise shall spring up as certainly as the seeds sown in the garden.

And so Simeon sings – sings of God’s dawning salvation which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples…a light for revelation to the Gentiles.” And Anna praises God and testifies to this child “to all who were looking for the redemption of Jerusalem.”

Fidelity and anticipation. Something big is happening. Something dramatic is occurring. God is fulfilling his promises. The wise elders see. The longed for day is come. The lowly are hearing good news proclaimed.

Much of the Midwest is under a thick blanket of snow. It was reported that Erie, Pennsylvania, received over five feet. Spring seems like an unthinkable promise when you are shoveling through such depths. But Simeon and Anna have eyes to see. And they testify to us of God’s faithfulness. The season has turned. The days are growing longer. The light is come.

The Prayer for December 31, 2017

Gracious God,
by whose word we live
and whose promises all come to fulfillment:
we give you thanks for those faithful among your people
who, like Simeon and Anna, have eyes to see your dawning work among us.
Grant that, with them, we might see where your hand is working
and share in its joy.

The Texts for December 31, 2017

First Reading: Isaiah 61:10 – 62:3
“The Lord GOD will cause righteousness and praise to spring up before all the nations” –
In the years after the return from exile, the prophet speaks to a discouraged and weary people of a vindication to come.

Second Reading: Galatians 4:4-7
“When the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son.” – Paul recites the core message of what God has done in Christ for these Galatians, making them members of God’s household and heirs of God’s promise through the gift of the Spirit in Christ.

Gospel: Luke 2:21-40 (appointed: 22-40)
“When the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, Joseph and Mary brought Jesus up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord.”
– The narrative of Jesus’ birth continues with Mary and Joseph’s faithful obedience and the recognition and reception of Jesus by Simeon and Anna, representatives of faithful Israel.

For the psalm on the Sunday in Christmas we sing a Christmas carol. The appointed Psalm is: Psalm 148 – “Praise the Lord from the heavens… Praise the Lord from the earth… He has raised up a horn for his people.”

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Montreal_-_Plateau,_day_of_snow_-_200312.jpg

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Holy Spirit

Watching for the Morning of June 4, 2017

Year A

The Festival of Pentecost

Into a world filled with many destructive and deceitful spirits, God lavishes his life-giving, creative and transforming Spirit on the world. It is a holy spirit, unlike the spirits of anger, intolerance, revenge, desire, greed and hate that divide the world and fill it with violence and invective. It gathers a community of all nations. It speaks to the core of our hearts in our native tongue. It summons us to step onto the shores of the new creation, to be washed in the Spirit, to be participants in the life of the age to come. It is a spirit that bears the fruit of love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control.”

It is a spirit that inspires and empowers fidelity to God and neighbor. It is a spirit that teaches manifold forgiveness and love of enemies. It is a spirit that leads us to lives of service and sacrifice. It is a spirit that binds and heals, a spirit that sings and rejoices, a spirit that prays and praises, a spirit that speaks grace to the world.

We have seen it in Moses and the prophets. We have seen it in the skill of Bezalel. We have seen it in the courage of Gideon, the poetry of David, the song of Mary. We have seen it in the fidelity of Simeon and witness of Anna. We have seen it the forgiveness of Stephen and the generosity of Barnabas. We have seen it in the boldness of Philip and the obedience of Peter. We have seen it in the lives of those recognize as saints and martyrs. We have seen it in the kindness and generosity and faithfulness of any number of people who have touched our lives with grace and truth.

We have seen it wherever love prevails.

It is a holy spirit. The holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit that shall govern every heart in that day when swords are beaten into plowshares and the river of the water of life washes over the world.

It is the Spirit given to us in Christ now.

It is the Spirit by which we are called to live.

(For those who follow this blog regularly, I apologize for the paucity of recent posts. Writing time has been taken up by the special preaching series underway in our parish.)

The Prayer for June 4, 2017

O God of every nation,
who by the breath of your Spirit gave life to the world
and anointed Jesus to bring new birth to all:
breathe anew upon us and upon all who gather in your name,
that in every place and to all people
we may proclaim your wondrous work;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for June 4, 2017

Pentecost Reading: Acts 2:1-21
“When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting.” – With the sound of wind and the image of fire, evoking God’s appearance at Sinai and fulfilling the promise of Joel, God pours out the Holy Spirit upon the first believers.

First Reading: Numbers 11:24-30
“The Lord came down in the cloud and spoke to [Moses], and took some of the spirit that was on him and put it on the seventy elders.” – When the burden of hearing every complaint of the people in the wilderness becomes too great for Moses, God has him appoint seventy elders to receive a share of the spirit. The text contains the prophetic remark of Moses Would that all the Lord’s people were prophets, and that the Lord would put his spirit on them!”

Psalmody: Psalm 104:24-31 (assigned: 104:24-34, 35b)
“When you send your Spirit, they are created, and you renew the face of the earth.”
– In a psalm celebrating the wonders of creation, the poet marvels at the manifold creatures of the world, and the breath/spirit of God that gives them life.

Second Reading: 1 Corinthians 12:1-13 (assigned: 12:3b-13)
“To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good.” –
Paul teaches the troubled Corinthian congregation about the gifts of the Spirit, emphasizing that they are given for God’s purpose to the benefit of others.

Gospel: John 7:37-39
“‘Out of the believer’s heart shall flow rivers of living water.’ Now he said this about the Spirit, which believers in him were to receive – During the celebration that prays for the autumn rains and remembers Ezekiel’s promise of a life-giving river flowing from the temple, Jesus calls those who are thirsty to come to him.

(Our parish uses the alternate Gospel reading for Pentecost because the text from John 20 was used on the second Sunday of Easter.)

John 20:19-23
“‘As the Father has sent me, so I send you.’ When he had said this he breathed on them and said ‘Receive the Holy Spirit.’” – On the evening of that first day of the week, the risen Christ commissions his followers and anoints them with the Spirit.

Image: Unidentified, may have been made by Hardman and Co.. Spirit with Sevenfold Gifts, from Art in the Christian Tradition, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library, Nashville, TN. http://diglib.library.vanderbilt.edu/act-imagelink.pl?RC=55828 [retrieved June 1, 2017]. Original source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/paullew/5827717752/.

The turning of the tide

File:Sand castle, Cannon Beach.jpg

Saturday

Luke 2:21-40

25Now there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon…

Three times in this paragraph the Spirit is mentioned. The Holy Spirit “rested” on Simeon. It “revealed to him… that he would not see death before he had seen the Lord’s Messiah.” And the Spirit “guided” him to enter the temple.

Deep in Luke’s Gospel is this notion that Christ Jesus is accompanied by an outpouring of the Spirit. It is Luke who tells us of the Pentecost wonder when the Spirit empowers the followers of Jesus to bear witness in every language. It is Luke who connects the gift of the Holy Spirit with baptism into Christ – the gift of the Spirit to Cornelius and his family forcing Peter to baptize those who had received the baptismal gift. In Luke the Spirit descends on Jesus not when he is baptized by John (a baptism of repentance) but after, when Jesus is praying. In Luke again and again we see and hear the Spirit at work.

There are wonders galore in the opening chapters of Luke’s gospel – the appearance of an angel to Zechariah, the wondrous birth of John, the appearance of an angel to Mary announcing the birth of Jesus, the angelic witness to the shepherds, the witness of ancient scripture, the prophetic promise that the coming one will baptize the world in the Spirit, the voice from heaven declaring that this Jesus is God’s son.

We speak of the Spirit rather casually in the church, but presence of the Spirit is part of the wonder of the events in and around Jesus. It is a sign of the age to come, a witness that the ages are turning from this age of sin and sorrow to the age of grace and life. The world is being reborn. The reign of God is dawning. The Spirit of God cannot be held back, but splashes forth like the waves of a rising tide.

Jesus is not born into a static world to speak of the hope of a heaven; he is born into the dying days of this world to bring the first days of that age to come when all things are made new. The marching armies of the Caesars and all their ideological descendants will yield to the heavenly host. The law of revenge, lex talionis, is yielding to the law of love. The principle of “me” and “mine” is yielding to the deeper truth of “us” and “ours”. Forgiveness will overflow. Compassion. Mercy. Shared bread. Healing. The gifts and fruits of the Spirit are loose in the world. The breath of God in Christ is breathed upon us.

And it is visible from the very beginning in the faithful poor like Simeon and Anna and the parents of this child who come to fulfill all righteousness. The tide has turned. Our castles of sand built by sweat and tears are being swept away for a home that stands forever on rock.

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ASand_castle%2C_Cannon_Beach.jpg By Curt Smith from Bellevue, WA, USA (Sand Castle at Cannon Beach) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Christ is entered into the world

File:Simeon with the Infant Jesus Brandl after 1725 National Gallery Prague.jpg

This is a lightly edited reprint of a posting in 2014

Thursday

Luke 2

28Simeon took him in his arms and praised God

Christmas lingers. At least it should linger. Not because of the twelve day ecclesiastical season, but because the Christ is born. The Christ is entered into the world. The Christ of God, the anointed one, the embodiment of God’s Word – the embodiment of God’s self-expression, God’s communication, God’s voice that creates all things, that reveals God’s own heart and will and passion, that calls all creation into a living relationship, that gathers the creation to himself – is incarnate in this infant/child/man of Bethlehem and Nazareth, this infant/child/man of temple and town and wilderness, this infant/child/man of cross and empty tomb.

The Christ is entered into the world. The true and perfect son, who honors the Father with his every breath, is come. The son we should be but were not. The son we are in him.

The Christ is entered into the world. He cries as a hungry infant. He laughs as a delighted child, playing the ancient equivalent of “peek-a-boo.” He shouts as a rambunctious boy, sporting with friends. He labors as a man with sweat and satisfaction. He prays and ponders the holy writings as a child and as a man. He weeps at the sorrow of death in the village, and witnesses the reality of Roman might. He enjoys the village wedding feast and ponders the feast that has no end. He reflects on the bonds of friendship and the pains of betrayal. He recognizes the beauty of the world around him and the beauty of human kindness. He sees the brutality of the world around him and the human capacity for violence. He knows the joy of song and dance. He never has the privilege of chocolate, but he knows the sweetness of honey. He knows the wonder of the temple and the mystery hidden within. He watches prodigal sons perish at the gates of far away cities, and witnesses the shame of their parents. He knows the blind and lame who depend upon village charity, and sees those who give nothing. He watches foreign soldiers slap down old men on the road and shame their women. He sees those who collude and those who resist and the many who keep their heads down and hope against the knock in the night.

The Christ is entered into the world. And he abides in the world. Risen, yet embodied still in his people. Risen, yet present in the poor. “As you did to the least of these you did to me…”

Christ is entered into the world. He abides in this world where human creativity and craft have made weapons of unimaginable destruction. He abides in this world where some cannot breathe and others fail to understand. He abides in a world of mothers shielding children from bombs in the night. He abides in a world of vineyard weddings and children making sandcastles at the shore. He abides in a world where those who celebrate Christmas are threatened and abused and others worry over the cost. He abides in a world where fear creeps and violence claims authority. He abides in a world where some children rise carefree and others scrounge the trash heaps. He abides in us who weep and sing. He abides in us who are mindless and mindful of all that transcends.

The Christ is come. The voice at the beginning and end of time that, in love, calls a world into being and, in love, calls a world to new beginnings, speaks in human form and human actions and human words.

He calls the world into peace. He calls the world into joy. He calls the world into giving. He calls the world into love.

He calls us into peace, into joy, into giving, into love.

Christmas lingers. Christ lingers. And our adoration of the wondrous child lingers. For Christ is entered into the world.

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ASimeon_with_the_Infant_Jesus_Brandl_after_1725_National_Gallery_Prague.jpg By Janmad (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

“Break forth together into singing”

File:Menologion of Basil 037.jpg

Watching for the Morning of January 1, 2017

The Sunday in Christmas

Oprah Winfrey seems to be everywhere on television promoting Weight Watchers. For the society around us, Christmas is over. The feasting and sweetness is finished; now it’s time to lose weight. And if Christmas is only about gifts, then once the gifts are opened the holiday is finished. Drag the tree out to the curb. Take down the lights. All that remains is football.

But if Christmas is about the gifts of God come to the world in the child of Bethlehem, then there is much more to celebrate.

Sunday continues the Christmas Season. It is that wonderful oasis between the feast of the Nativity and the Epiphany of our Lord. The community gathers again in the aura of that silent night to hear the continuation of the story begun on Christmas Eve. The child greeted by the song of angels and the wonderment of shepherds is greeted by the faithful poor in Israel: Simeon yearning for God’s day of grace to come, and Anna absorbed in prayer. These recognize the Christ child as God’s anointed and sing of him to all who will listen.

Sunday the prophet will call us to join the song. And Paul will speak of what God has done in “the fullness of time”. Joy reverberates throughout the texts and liturgy, and the presence of the Holy Spirit. But we also see the first shadow that reminds us of the great drama underway: Simeon speaks of “the falling and the rising of many in Israel” and the “sword” that will pierce Mary’s soul. Heaven sings. The faithful sing. But the powers of this world will not sing. So Good Friday awaits, but the grave will not reign: the new creation is at hand.

The Prayer for January 1, 2017

Gracious God,
by whose word we live
and whose promises all come to fulfillment,
we give you thanks for those faithful among your people
who, like Simeon and Anna, have eyes to see your dawning work among us.
Grant that, with them, we might see where your hand is working
and share in its joy;
through your son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for January 1, 2017

First Reading: Isaiah 52:7-10,
“How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of the messenger who announces peace.” – The prophet stands before the rubble of Jerusalem and hears the stones singing. He summons the people to rejoice in God’s saving work and declares that “all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God.”

Second Reading: Galatians 4:4-7
“When the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son.” – Paul recites the core message of what God has done in Christ for these Galatians, making them members of God’s household and heirs of God’s promise through the gift of the Spirit in Christ.

Gospel: Luke 2:21-40
“When the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, Joseph and Mary brought Jesus up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord.” – The narrative of Jesus’ birth continues with Mary and Joseph’s faithful obedience and the recognition and reception of Jesus by Simeon and Anna, representatives of faithful Israel.

Our parish departs from the appointed texts for the Christmas season in order to present the birth narratives with some integrity: reading Luke 2:1-20 on Christmas Eve (and John 1 on Christmas morning), then the remainder of Luke 2 on the Sunday in Christmas and the Account of the Magi and Herod’s attempt to kill Jesus on the second Sunday after Christmas, celebrated as the Sunday of the Epiphany.

This does mean that we sometimes have to drop a Sunday when our celebration of the Epiphany falls after January 6th (as this year), in order to reconnect with the appointed texts. So we will celebrate the Baptism of our Lord on January 15, then skip to the texts for the third Sunday after the Epiphany.

The Appointed Texts for the first Sunday in Christmas, year A

First Reading: Isaiah 63:7-9 (“It was…his presence that saved them”)

Psalmody: Psalm 148 (Praise the Lord from the heavens.)

Second Reading: Hebrews 2:10-18 (“He had to become like his brothers and sisters in every respect.”)

Gospel: Matthew 2:13-23 (The flight to Egypt and slaughter of the innocents)

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AMenologion_of_Basil_037.jpg By Anonymous [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Christ is entered into the world

Sunday Evening

Luke 2

File:Simeon. Mironov.jpg

Saint Simeon with the Christ child. 2014. Oil on canvas. 90×70. Artist A.N. Mironov

28Simeon took him in his arms and praised God

Christmas lingers. At least it should linger. Not because of the twelve day ecclesiastical season, but because the Christ is born. The Christ is entered into the world. The Christ of God, the anointed one, the embodiment of God’s Word – the embodiment of God’s self-expression, God’s communication, God’s voice that creates all things, that reveals God’s own heart and will and passion, that calls all creation into a living relationship, that gathers the creation to himself – is incarnate in this infant/child/man of Bethlehem and Nazareth, this infant/child/man of temple and town and wilderness, this infant/child/man of cross and empty tomb.

The Christ is entered into the world. The true and perfect son, who honors the Father with his every breath, is come. The son we should be but were not. The son we are in him.

The Christ is entered into the world. He cries as a hungry child. He laughs as a delighted child, playing the ancient equivalent of “peek-a-boo.” He shouts as a rambunctious boy, sporting with friends. He labors as a man with sweat and satisfaction. He prays and ponders the holy writings as a child and as a man. He weeps at the sorrow of death in the village, and witnesses the reality of Roman might. He enjoys the village wedding feast and ponders the feast that has no end. He reflects on the bonds of friendship and the pains of betrayal. He recognizes the beauty of the world around him and the beauty of human kindness. He sees the brutality of the world around him and the human capacity for violence. He knows the joy of song and dance. He never has the privilege of chocolate, but he knows the sweetness of honey. He knows the wonder of the temple and the mystery hidden within. He watches prodigal sons perish at the gates of far away cities, and witnesses the shame of their parents. He knows the blind and lame who depend upon village charity, and sees those who give nothing. He watches foreign soldiers slap down old men on the road – and shame their women. He sees those who collude and those who resist and the many who keep their heads down and hope against the knock in the night.

The Christ is entered into the world. And he abides in the world. Risen, yet embodied still in his people. Risen, yet present in the poor. “As you did to the least of these you did to me…”

Christ is entered into the world. He abides in this world where human creativity and craft have made weapons of unimaginable destruction. He abides in this world where some cannot breathe and others fail to understand. He abides in a world of mothers shielding children from bombs in the night. He abides in a world of vineyard weddings and children making sandcastles at the shore. He abides in a world where those who celebrate Christmas are threatened and abused and others count the cost. He abides in a world where fear creeps and violence claims authority. He abides in a world where some children rise carefree and others scrounge the trash heaps. He abides in us who weep and sing. He abides in us who are mindless and mindful of all that transcends.

The Christ is come. The voice at the beginning and end of time that, in love, calls a world into being and, in love, calls a world to new beginnings, speaks in human form and human actions and human words.

He calls the world into peace. He calls the world into joy. He calls the world into giving. He calls the world into love.

He calls us into peace, into joy, into giving, into love.

Christmas lingers. Christ lingers. And our service of him lingers. For Christ is entered into the world.

Image: By Andrey Mironov (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Faithful God; faithful people

Watching for the morning of December 28

The Sunday in Christmas

Singing Silent Night on Christmas Eve at Los Altos Lutheran Church (2012)

Singing Silent Night on Christmas Eve at Los Altos Lutheran Church (2012)

Our parish departs from the assigned lectionary readings during Christmas. There are wonderful feast days during the 12 days of Christmas: St. Stephen, the first martyr, on the 26th; St. John the Evangelist on the 27th; The Holy Innocents on the 28th; The Holy Name of Jesus on January 1. But these days and the various assigned lessons for the First and, sometimes, Second Sunday of Christmas seem to obscure the thread of this season. So in our parish we read the Luke Nativity on Christmas Eve and the John text “the word became flesh and dwelt among us” on Christmas Day. Then on the Sunday in Christmas we read the remainder of the Luke text, with Simeon and Anna greeting the Christ child, and on the following Sunday, nearest January 6th, we celebrate the Epiphany and read of the birth, the magi, Herod’s frightful response and the flight to Egypt from Matthew.

This Sunday, then, has us still inside Luke’s narrative of a faithful God and a faithful people. Mary and Jesus come to fulfill the commands of the Torah in the temple. There, Simeon and Anna wait, longing for God’s anointed – and they have eyes to recognize the promise embodied in this peasant child, Jesus. The faithful God has fulfilled his promise.

But, for all the joy of God’s coming deliverance, for all the sweetness of these Lucan narratives, there is a shadow over this child. Simeon sees what Mary has sung: “This child is set for the falling and rising of many in Israel.” The wheel turns; the poor are lifted up, but the greedy rich sent empty away. Simeon sees and rejoices, but also perceives the opposition this child shall engender – and the sword that shall pierce Mary.

Jesus is perfect grace and real trouble. He is the fulfillment of all God’s promises and the provocative voice announcing a new world. At his first sermon, among his own people in Nazareth, his “coming out” party following his baptism by John and the descent of God’s Spirit, the congregation will rise up and try to kill him.

The faithful rejoice to see this Jesus, but others will not – and everything hinges on how that tale spins out.

The Prayer for the Sunday in Christmas, December 28, 2014

Gracious God,
by whose word we live
and whose promises all come to fulfillment,
we give you thanks for those faithful among your people
who, like Simeon and Anna, have eyes to see your dawning work among us.
Grant that, with them, we might see where your hand is working
and share in its joy;
through your son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for December 28, 2014

First Reading: Isaiah 52:7-10,
“How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of the messenger who announces peace.” – In a text full of words that ring with added meaning for the Christian community – words like ‘proclaim good news’ (a noun form of this verb is rendered Gospel in English) and ‘Salvation’ the prophet calls the nation to rejoice in God’s work of bringing the exiles home.

Second Reading: Galatians 4:4-7
“When the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son.” – Paul recites the core message of what God has done in Christ for these Galatians. They are members of God’s household and heirs of God’s promise through the gift of the Spirit in Christ, not because of their outward obedience to the tradition.

Gospel: Luke 2:21-40
“When the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, Joseph and Mary brought Jesus up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord.” – The narrative of Jesus’ birth continues with Mary and Joseph’s faithful obedience and the recognition and reception of Jesus by Simeon and Anna, representatives of faithful Israel.

Font of blessing

Watching for the morning of December 29

The Sunday in Christmas

Rembrandt - Simeon and Anna Recognize the Lord...

Rembrandt – Simeon and Anna Recognize the Lord in Jesus – WGA19102 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The peace and joy of the Christmas celebration reverberates through the days of Christmas as the community gathers again to hear the remainder of Luke’s narrative of the birth of Jesus.  Mary and Joseph, faithful Israelites, bring the child to the temple to conduct the appropriate rites.  There Simeon and Anna, pious elders who are waiting for the redemption of Israel, recognize God’s promise fulfilled in this child of Bethlehem.

Amidst the joy, the shadow of this child’s fate can be seen: “This child is destined for the falling and the rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be opposed so that the inner thoughts of many will be revealed – and a sword will pierce your own soul too.”  A revolution is underway.  When God draws near to save, to heal, to restore the world, change comes.  Injustices must be set right.  The mighty will fall.

And they don’t fall without a fight.

But for now, there is joy.  And Anna speaks about the child to all who are “looking for the redemption of Jerusalem,” looking for Jerusalem to become the city of peace and font of blessing for all nations.

The Prayer for the Sunday in Christmas

Gracious God,
by whose word we live
and whose promises all come to fulfillment,
we give you thanks for those faithful among your people
who, like Simeon and Anna, have eyes to see your dawning work among us.
Grant that, with them, we might see where your hand is working
and share in its joy;
through your son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for the Sunday in Christmas 2013

(Our parish departs from the assigned readings for the Sunday after Christmas to continue the Luke narrative of the reception of the infant Jesus by Simeon and Anna, representatives of faithful Israel.  The following Sunday we will celebrate as Epiphany, reading the narrative from Matthew)

First Reading: Isaiah 52:7-10
“How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of the messenger who announces peace.”
– like a runner coming from the battlefield with news of victory, the prophet heralds God’s dawning salvation.

Second Reading: Galatians 4:4-7
“When the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, 5in order to redeem those who were under the law.” –
a summary of the proclamation of the early Christian community.

Gospel: Luke 2:21-40
“Master, now you are dismissing your servant in peace, according to your word; for my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation to the Gentiles and for glory to your people Israel.”
– Simeon and Anna, representatives of faithful Israel, recognize the infant Jesus as the fulfillment of God’s promises.