A threat to the order of the world

File:Paruzzaro, San Marcello 035.JPG

Watching for the Morning of March 25, 2018

Year B

Palm Sunday / The Sunday of the Passion

Sunday is both festive and sobering. It begins with that great procession into the church waving palm branches, the crucifer bearing the cross and pounding on the sanctuary door crying out “Open to me the gates of righteousness,” and the usher flinging wide the doors and declaring “This is the gate of the Lord; The righteous shall enter through them.” The pastor exclaims, “The stone which the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone” and the congregation responds “This is the Lord’s doing, it is marvelous in our eyes.”

The organ swells, the hymn begins, “All glory, laud, and honor to you, redeemer, king.” The crowd enters, evoking the great drama of Jesus entering Jerusalem and the coronation rituals of Israel’s ancient kings. The choir will sing something loud and boisterous. And, as the music fades away and we settle into our seats, we will hear that this Jesus will be crowned with thorns.

We have come to Jerusalem. Our Lenten fast is nearly over. What lies ahead of us in the week that follows are the sacred days of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, the Great Vigil of Easter, and Easter morn.

We have heard so many tragic stories lately, it is hard for this story of Jesus to move us anew: Young people with their phones videoing their flight from a gunman. Images of endless rubble in Syria. War upon war in the region. Random bombs exploding in the streets of Austin. More school shootings. Young people marching and hateful speech attacking them. Presidential lies. Congressional lies. Assassinations. Corruptions. Corporate malfeasance. Porn stars on the nightly news. It will almost be a relief to hear a story as relatively simple as the story of Jesus’ passion.

But it is not a small story; it is the whole human story in one terrible story: perfect goodness hated, tortured and driven from the world.

Except he is not driven from the world. The grave is empty.

The story we tell of Jesus’ final hours is not meant to make us sad. It is not told to evoke sympathy. It is told to reveal the callous brutality of power. It is a mirror on the human race, a mirror on the human soul. Something is wrong in us. Yet even more importantly, the story is told to reveal the heart of God. God does not answer violence with violence. God does not answer hate with hate. All our cruelty and sorrows God willingly bears. The only judgment here is what we must face about ourselves.

Abut us and about God, but most importantly this story tells us about this Jesus. Though the world judged him a fraud, God vindicated him. He is condemned as a sinner. He is crucified as a threat to the order of the world. But God voids the sentence. The tomb is empty. The words of Jesus stand true. His deeds abide.

We will tell the story Sunday, but it is too much for one day. So we will tell it more slowly beginning next Thursday until we are prepared to walk into the light.

This Sunday we turn to the passion narrative that will occupy us on the three days from Maundy Thursday to the Vigil of Easter. Daily verses and reflections continue to be posted at Holy Seasons.

The Prayer for March 25, 2018

Almighty God,
Jesus, your anointed,
walked the holy path to Jerusalem and the cross,
faithful in all his steps,
that your new creation might be born in us.
Wrap us ever in your eternal mercy
and guide us in all our ways that we may be faithful to you and to all.

The Texts for March 25, 2018

Processional Gospel Mark 11:1-11
“’Go into the village ahead of you, and immediately as you enter it, you will find tied there a colt that has never been ridden; untie it and bring it.’” – Jesus arranges to enter Jerusalem as the kings of old, and a great crowd responds with cries of acclamation.

Processional Psalmody: Psalm 118:1-2, 19-29
“Open to me the gates of righteousness, that I may enter through them and give thanks to the Lord.” – A song of salvation from an ancient festival in Israel as the community enters through the gates into the temple, rejoicing in God’s deliverance.

Gospel Mark 14:1-16:8
“It was two days before the Passover and the festival of Unleavened Bread. The chief priests and the scribes were looking for a way to arrest Jesus by stealth and kill him.” – The climax and center of Mark’s Gospel is the sequence of events in Jerusalem when Jesus is arrested and crucified.

Reading: Philippians 2:5-11
“He humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death – even death on a cross.”
– An early Christian hymn reciting the humiliation and exaltation of Jesus. It is used by Paul to remind the community of the mind of Christ and to call them to abide in his Spirit.

The appointed reading for Sunday include also Isaiah 50:4-9a (“I gave my back to those who struck me, and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard.”) and Psalm 31:9-16 (“They plot to take my life. But I trust in you, O Lord.”). The appointed Mark text is from 14:1-15:47 or an abbreviated portion, Mark 15:1-39, (40-47).

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Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AParuzzaro%2C_San_Marcello_035.JPG Saint Marcello church in Paruzzaro [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

 

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Palms and Passion

File:Assisi-frescoes-entry-into-jerusalem-pietro lorenzetti.jpg

Watching for the Morning of April 9, 2017

Palm Sunday / Sunday of the Passion

A noble dying, a shameful death. A royal claim upon the city, and a rejection of that claim. The cries of Hosanna are not sounds of praise, but pleas for aid and deliverance made to the passing king – but then the crowd will cry for blood. Sunday is both. Palm Sunday and Passion Sunday. The festive gathering and procession to church with palm fronts waving and the fabulous hymn “All Glory Laud and Honor,” and the gut-wrenching story of a mob in the night and fleeing disciples and Rome determined to show this royal claimant the true power and might of empire.

Our Lenten season is nearing its end. And though Easter is coming, the light that shines on Easter morning shines against the dark background of the human enterprise. We are a long way, yet, from living as children of God.

But the story is not only about human violence and power; it is also about the faithfulness of God and the fidelity of Jesus. He is willing to go to his death without breaking faith in the promise of God that the Spirit of God shall prevail. The reign of God shall dawn. The human heart shall be transformed. Grace and mercy shall govern all creation. Death shall give way to life.

So Sunday is joy and pensiveness and wonder. Sunday is celebration and mystery and thankfulness. Sunday begins with palms in our hands and then brings us to the table to receive the bread – the foretaste of the feast that will come.  It is a good and proper way to prepare us for the observance of the three days that carry us from Maundy Thursday into the first light of Easter.

(I apologize to those who follow this blog regularly that, during this season of Lent, it has been somewhat erratic. I have been focused primarily on the daily devotions for Lent we publish on the church website and at our Lent site.)

The Prayer for April 9, 2017

Almighty God, Holy and Wondrous;
trusting your promise, Jesus entered Jerusalem
knowing the path that lay before him.
Grant us a share of his Spirit
and the courage to follow his way of love;
through your son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for April 9, 2017

Procession with Palms Reading: Matthew 21:1-11
“The crowds that went ahead of him and that followed were shouting, “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest heaven!” – Matthew’s account of Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem.

Processional Psalm: Psalm 118:1-2, 19-29
“Open to me the gates of righteousness, that I may enter through them and give thanks to the Lord… The stone that the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone.” – A song of salvation from an ancient festival in Israel as the community enters through the gates into the temple, rejoicing in God’s deliverance.

Reading from the prophets: Isaiah 53:1-6
“He was wounded for our transgressions, crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the punishment that made us whole.” – Isaiah’s vision of the suffering servant who bears the sins of the people.

Passion Reading: Matthew 26:1 – 27:61
“Over his head they put the charge against him, which read, “This is Jesus, the King of the Jews.” – The passion narrative according to Matthew.

Readings as appointed for Passion Sunday

First Reading: Isaiah 50:4-9a
“I did not hide my face from insult and spitting.” – One of the ‘servant songs’ from Isaiah describing a teacher who suffers, but trusts completely in God’s vindication.

Psalmody: Psalm 31:9-16
“I hear the whispering of many– terror all around!– as they scheme together against me, as they plot to take my life.” – A cry from one who faces the threat of a violent death, yet expresses his complete trust in God. It echoes with themes of the passion.

Second Reading: Philippians 2:5-11
“Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited, but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave.”
– An early Christian hymn reciting the humiliation and exaltation of Jesus. It is used by Paul to remind the community of the mind of Christ and to call them to abide in his Spirit.

Gospel: Matthew 26:14 – 27:66 or Matthew 27:11-54

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AAssisi-frescoes-entry-into-jerusalem-pietro_lorenzetti.jpg By Pietro lorenzetti [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

“I stand at the door and knock”

Watching for the Morning of March 29, 2015

Year B

Palm Sunday / The Sunday of the Passion

File:Northwestern College Chapel Door.jpgSunday, the young person carrying the cross representing Christ in our midst, will leads us in procession from our picnic area up to the sanctuary, She will stop at the closed doors of the church, knock loudly and cry out with the words of the psalm: Open to me the gates of righteousness, that I may enter through them and give thanks to the Lord.”

It is a symbolic gesture that reminds us of Jesus coming to Jerusalem to claim the allegiance of the city. Jesus’ arrival on a donkey amidst shouts of acclamation was a claim to kingship, following the ancient pattern of Judah’s kings coming up from the Jordan and knocking at the door of the temple.

With those three loud knocks the usher will throw open the doors so that the cross and the crowd may enter. He will answer the crucifer’s request with the words that are also from our psalm:

“This is the gate of the Lord;
the righteous shall enter through them.”

I will call out to the crowd:

“The stone which the builders rejected
has become the chief cornerstone!”

And the people will answer:

“This is the Lord’s doing;
it is marvelous in our eyes!”

In that simple yet profound action lies the most important question for any congregation’s life: Is Christ welcome in our midst? Is our door open to him? Do we recognize him as the Lord of our sanctuary? Do we rejoice in his presence?

The answer to that question is never truly clear. Every parish, of course, claims to belong to Christ. But what we claim does not always match what we are.  Jerusalem was the city of God. The leaders of the city and temple believed that all they did was for the glory of God. But the story that follows is one of rejection and murder. The Christ is slain, not welcomed.

Palm Sunday – the Sunday of the Passion – is great fun. The gathering before worship with coffee and hot cross buns, the children escorting the cross and the energy of the procession with palms, the singing of “All Glory, Laud and Honor” as we crowd into the sanctuary – it’s delightful. But it all contains a serious question. And that question is not only whether the congregation receives Christ with joy, but whether each of us welcomes him as our true and eternal king. For the kingship of Jesus is not like the British monarch – good theater, parades, and a benevolent smile on a variety of good works – Christ has come to reign. Christ has come to do the actual governing: to be the prime minister, the house of Lords and the house of commons, to set policy and practice.

Christ knocks at the door to claim our allegiance. Christ has come to govern our hearts and our lives. Christ has come to make us sons and daughters of God.

Behold, I stand at the door and knock

For our daily Lent devotion from Los Altos Lutheran church, and for sermons and other information on Lent see our Lent site.

Our theme this Lent is Renewal, and for the final week in Lent: Renewing the World with Faith, Hope and Love

 

The Prayer for March 29, 2015

As Jesus came to Jerusalem, O God,
the crowds were overcome with hope and joy.
Watch over us,
renewing our lives and our world
that we may receive him as our true Lord and King
and prove faithful to him and to all
in lives of Faith. Hope and Love;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever

The Texts for March 29, 2015

Processional Gospel Mark 11:1-11
“’Go into the village ahead of you, and immediately as you enter it, you will find tied there a colt that has never been ridden; untie it and bring it.’” – Jesus arranges to enter Jerusalem as the kings of old, and a great crowd responds with cries of acclamation.

Processional Psalmody: Psalm 118:1-2, 19-29
“Open to me the gates of righteousness, that I may enter through them and give thanks to the Lord.” – A song of salvation from an ancient festival in Israel as the community enters through the gates into the temple, rejoicing in God’s deliverance.

Gospel Mark 14:1-16:8
“It was two days before the Passover and the festival of Unleavened Bread. The chief priests and the scribes were looking for a way to arrest Jesus by stealth and kill him.” – The climax and center of Mark’s Gospel is the sequence of events in Jerusalem when Jesus is arrested and crucified.

Reading: Philippians 2:5-11
“He humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death – even death on a cross.”
– An early Christian hymn reciting the humiliation and exaltation of Jesus. It is used by Paul to remind the community of the mind of Christ and to call them to abide in his Spirit.

 

Photo By Micah Taylor (originally posted to Flickr as Knock) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons