“If you love me…”

File:Brooklyn Museum - The Exhortation to the Apostles (Recommandation aux apôtres) - James Tissot.jpg

Watching for the Morning of May 21, 2017

The Sixth Sunday of Easter

Again, this Sunday, we hear Jesus speaking after supper on the night of his betrayal. Again we hear him providing for his little band as he faces what he knows will be his death. Again we hear him speak of the Spirit who will come, an ‘advocate’ who will turn the hearts of the crowd in their favor. Again we hear the promise that Jesus will come to his followers. Again we hear about love and fidelity and abiding. And again we hear about living out Jesus’ teaching: “They who have my commandments and keep them are those who love me.”

Fidelity to Jesus will mean fidelity to his teaching.  We are not joining team Jesus against team Pharisees. We are not joining team Jesus against team Humanists. We are not joining team Jesus against team Hillary or Team Trump. We are disciples, students, of the one who redeems the world: the one who forgives sins, who heals families and communities, who restores the world to its true source and life.

All the other promises weave together with this one: faithfulness is seen in the doing. There is no faith in concepts, ideas or doctrines. Nothing is gained by believing in a six-day creation or a literal ark. Nothing is gained by nodding to the notion of forgiveness. Those who have looked into the eyes of grace will live grace. Those who have fed at his table will feed others. Those who have been touched by his healing hand will extend their hand to others.

When I was about ten my step-father allowed a friend to store his sports car in our garage. We sat in the driver’s seat and roared through the gears, drinking in the wonder of this machine. But make no mistake; we were not driving it.

So, Sunday, Paul will call the citizens of Athens to hear the message that the “unknown God” has been made known in this Jesus. And the author of First Peter will summon us to do what is good even if it brings suffering. And the psalmist will speak of faithfulness in the midst of trial. And the table will be set that welcomes all and the songs will be sung that hint of the harmony to come, and we will be drawn again into the redemptive love made visible in this Jesus who sends the Spirit and comes to abide with us and in us.

Preaching Series: Genesis 3: Fall

We are in the third week of our series going through key stories of the scripture to see, as Jesus showed his followers on the road to Emmaus, that the scriptures bear witness to the sacrificial and redeeming love of God that is manifest ultimately in the death and resurrection of Jesus.

The story before us this week is the moment when the harmony of God’s good garden goes wrong, when humanity reaches out for the knowledge of life’s joys and sorrows and finds itself now alienated from the world, one another and God.

We are capable of imagining a world of perfect peace and harmony, but we know that the world is full of woe. We are capable of ugliness of spirit and act. We hate. We fear. We abuse. We wage war. We build ovens. We harm even those who are closest to us with words that should have gone unsaid. We know the beauty of the world; why must we also know its ugliness? “The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars.”

The Prayer for May 21, 2017

Gracious God,
you have given us your Spirit as our advocate and guide
that we might abide in you and you in us.
Grant us courage and faith to follow where you lead,
to obey your commands,
to love as you love;
through your son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for May 21, 2017

First Reading: Acts 17:22-31
“Paul stood in front of the Areopagus and said, ‘Athenians, I see how extremely religious you are in every way.’” – Paul, traveling by himself to avoid a conspiracy to murder him, comes to Athens where he seeks to engage the leaders of that city with the message of God, the creator all peoples.

Psalmody: Psalm 66:8-20
“Bless our God, O peoples, let the sound of his praise be heard.” – The psalmist calls for all nations to praise God for his gracious deeds to deliver those in need.

Second Reading: 1 Peter 3:13-22
“For Christ also suffered for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, in order to bring you to God.” –
The author’s continuing exposition on baptism, now touches on the Ascension: “Baptism…now saves you–not as a removal of dirt from the body, but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who has gone into heaven and is at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers made subject to him.” The author urges his hearers to remain faithful in the face of hostility, to do what is good and be ready to give account for the hope that is in them.

Gospel: John 14: 15-21
“If you love me, you will keep my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, to be with you forever.” – Continuing last Sunday’s reading, Jesus makes provision for his followers in light of his impending death, promising that God will send the Holy Spirit (the ‘Paraclete’).

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ABrooklyn_Museum_-_The_Exhortation_to_the_Apostles_(Recommandation_aux_ap%C3%B4tres)_-_James_Tissot.jpg James Tissot [No restrictions or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.
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“Whoever has seen me has seen the Father”

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Watching for the Morning of May 14, 2017

The Fifth Sunday of Easter

It will be Mother’s Day and I know the men are planning something that involves fruit and sparkling beverages (under the direction of our female staff!). And while the texts are not about mothers, they are about profound love. Stephen, beneath the assault of an outraged mob heavy with stones, prays for God to forgive his murderers even as Jesus prayed for his. The psalm not only speaks of a deep and profound trust in God but, like Stephen’s prayer, takes us to the lips of Jesus on the cross: “Into your hand I commit my spirit.” The reading from 1 Peter urges us to “long for the pure, spiritual milk,” that we might “be built into a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ.” All of which leads us to Jesus providing for his followers in the face of his impending death and declaring: “Whoever has seen me has seen the Father.” In this good shepherd who lays down his life for the sheep, the heart of the universe is made visible.

Preaching Series: Genesis 2: Made for Relationship

This week we continue our special survey through the scriptures, prompted by Jesus’ teaching on the road to Emmaus when he led his followers through the scriptures to show how it points to the truth, visible in Jesus crucified and risen, of God’s redemptive love. The God who speaks and calls all things into being is now seen in the tenderness of forming the first human (Hebrew ‘adam’) from the ground (‘adamah’) and breathing into him the breath of life. It is a creature meant for relationship; “it is not good that the human should be alone.” And the search for the partner/companion equal to him leads ultimately to the deep sleep and a part taken to form another. Now come the words for ‘man’ (‘ish’) and ‘woman’ (‘ishah’) – not those for ‘male’ and ‘female’, but words that speak of relationship, words that evoke the connection of men and women in family and community. We are made for one another, even as we are made to be in relationship with God.

(The words are tricky to translate comfortably into English, but see Genesis 5:1-2 where it says: “When God created humankind (‘adam’), he made them in the likeness of God. Male and female he created them, and he blessed them and named them “Humankind” (‘adam’) when they were created.”)

The Prayer for May 14, 2017

Let not our hearts be troubled, O God;
teach us to put our hope and trust in you.
Guide us in your way;
keep us in your truth;
enfold us in your life
that your works of love, justice and mercy
may be done in us and through us;
through your son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for May 14, 2017

First Reading: Acts 7:55-60
“While they were stoning Stephen, he prayed, ‘Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.’ Then he knelt down and cried out in a loud voice, ‘Lord, do not hold this sin against them.’” – Stephen becomes a victim of communal violence for his preaching and teaching about Jesus, and in his dying embodies the faith and love Jesus modeled.

Psalmody: Psalm 31:1-5
“Into your hand I commit my spirit; you have redeemed me, O Lord, faithful God.” – A prayer of lament. The trust in God embodied in the psalm is reflected in Stephen and quoted by Jesus on the cross.

Second Reading: 1 Peter 2:2-10
“You are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, God’s own people, in order that you may proclaim the mighty acts of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.” –
Expounding on baptism, the author urges the believers to “grow into salvation” as living stones in a “spiritual house” (a spiritual temple).

Gospel: John 14:1-14
“Do not let your hearts be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me.” – Jesus makes provision for his followers in lieu of his impending death, urging them to remain faithful and assuring them that God’s resources are more than adequate to provide all their needs.

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ASofferenza_(1438714987).jpg By Roberto Ferrari from Campogalliano (Modena), Italy (Sofferenza) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The glory and end of the church

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Saturday

John 14:8-17, 25-27

26 The Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all that I have said to you.

The rehearsal this morning and all the food in the kitchen fills me with anticipation for tomorrow (there’s a barbecue after worship). Sometimes I wish the culture had some connection to Pentecost like it does to Christmas and Easter. I would love there to be a big crowd tomorrow with the energy that comes from a crowd and a holiday. But, at the same time, I am glad that this holy day hasn’t been coopted by the culture. It still belongs to the church.

So the sanctuary is ablaze in red and candles. The bells will lead a festive procession. We will hear people reading in a host of different languages. We will be invited to come for a laying on of hands and a prayer for the Spirit to heal and renew. And this is the Sunday the bread and wine are brought down and blessed in our midst with an adaption of the ancient anaphora of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church attributed to John, the son of Zebedee.

It is a unique worship service in the year, the third of the three great festivals of Christian faith: Christmas, Easter, Pentecost; the mystery of the incarnation, the wonder of the resurrection, the miracle of the Spirit given.

The festivals are linked, of course. The birth of Jesus would be little remembered but for the cross and empty tomb. The Spirit poured out on Pentecost is the Spirit present in Jesus. And the gift of the Spirit to all nations is connected to the dawning of the new creation in the resurrection.

The world is being reborn. The Spirit of God is given. Death is losing its hold. The scattered are gathered. The broken made whole. The dead raised. The corrupt judged. The hungry fed. The peacemakers inheriting the world. The world may war around us, but the day is begun when swords are beaten into plowshares. And we are inspirited to live that new creation.

It is common for people to say that Pentecost is the birthday of the church. But it is more accurate to say that Pentecost bears witness to the end of the church, to the day when every heart is filled with the Spirit and preachers and teachers are no longer needed.

No longer shall they teach one another,
or say to each other, “Know the Lord,”
for they shall all know me,
from the least of them to the greatest, says the Lord.

 

Picture: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3A2004_orford_03.JPG  By Ziko-C (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Fire and Wind

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Watching for the Morning of May 15, 2016

Year C

The Festival of Pentecost

Worship this coming Sunday is filled with powerful words and images: fire, stormy winds, life-giving Spirit, humanity’s rebellion from God and the collapse of the tower-building, empire-building, attempt by humanity to make a name for themselves. And behind the wind and fire stands the voice of God speaking at Sinai and the Israelites pleading for God to speak instead through Moses. And, ahead, the day when Babel is undone and all humanity gathered in perfect communion – a day that is dawned in Christ Jesus.

We begin on Sunday with the narrative from Acts 2 about Pentecost – the festival 50 days after Passover, at the end of the grain harvest, that remembered the revelation at Sinai when God gave the newly freed slaves the commandments that would guide them to be a just and merciful community. We hear how the Spirit fell upon Jesus followers, amidst the roar of wind and sight of flame, empowering them to proclaim God’s praise in every language. And in worship we will hear people reading Acts 2.38 (“Peter said to them, “Repent, and be baptized every one of you in the name of Jesus Christ so that your sins may be forgiven; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit.”) in many languages evoking that great and powerful day in which began the mission of the believers to the world.

Fire and wind – signifying the holy presence of God – and the voice of God sounding forth through Jesus’ followers. And then we will read of Babel and how humanity’s rejection of God’s command lead to confusion. We will hear the psalm sing of God’s Spirit that renews all life. We will hear Paul remind us that we have received God’s Spirit, that we are adopted as God’s sons and daughters, that we may walk in freedom and fidelity. And then we are again in John 14 hearing the promise of the Spirit, a promise fulfilled by the risen Christ.

And though worship will be fun and dramatic, and unique from all others in the year, it will also bid us come and kneel and pray for the Spirit to be stirred up within us – that we may know its healing and its power, that we might be faithful witnesses to the world.

The Prayer for May 15, 2016

O God of every nation,
who by the breath of your Spirit gave life to the world
and anointed Jesus to bring new birth to all:
breathe anew upon us
and upon all who gather in your name,
that in every place and to all people
we may proclaim your wondrous work.

The Texts for May 15, 2016

Pentecost Reading: Acts 2:1-21
“When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind.” – With the sound of wind and the image of fire, evoking God’s appearance at Sinai and fulfilling the promise of Joel, God pours out the Holy Spirit upon the first believers.

First Reading: Genesis 11:1-9
“Now the whole earth had one language and the same words.” – Humanity’s rebellion against God’s command to fill the earth, in order to build a city and a name for themselves, leads to the multiplicity of languages and the confusion of human speech.

Psalmody: Psalm 104:24-31 (appointed: 24-34, 35b)
“O Lord, how manifold are your works! In wisdom you have made them all; the earth is full of your creatures…When you send forth your spirit, they are created; and you renew the face of the ground.”
– The poet sings of God’s wondrous creation and life-giving and renewing Spirit.

Second Reading: Romans 8:12-17 (Appointed: 14-17)
“All who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. For you did not receive a spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received a spirit of adoption.”
Paul writes that we are heirs of God’s promise, adopted as God’s sons and daughters and sharing in the Spirit.

Gospel: John 14:8-17, 25-27
“The Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all that I have said to you.” – Jesus promises to send the Holy Spirit to be our guide and defender.

 

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AMildorfer%2C_Josef_Ignaz_-_Pentecost_-_1750s.jpg  By Creator:Josef Ignaz Mildorfer (http://www.gnadenquelle.eu/meditation.htm) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Not orphaned

9-11 memorial

Once More about Last Sunday

John 14:18-19, 23-29

18“I will not leave you orphaned; I am coming to you. 19In a little while the world will no longer see me, but you will see me; because I live, you also will live…Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them…”

These words sound so esoteric and spiritual to us. We forget that they are very real to the first century. The temple was the dwelling place of God. There God lived among the people. There his Spirit was present. There God’s angels ascended and descended like Jacob’s vision at Bethel. There stood the Holy of Holies, the Most Holy Place, where heaven touched earth and sins were forgiven and prayers arose like incense.

And now the temple is gone.

There is a hole in Manhattan where the twin towers stood. Two holes. They have been made into beautiful pools, water flowing down their sides, the names of all the dead etched in black stone. It is a lovely memorial.

The World Trade Center was not, for us, where God was present. Far from it. But there is still a hole there, an ache, an absence of what was and its terrible price. Imagine that one site was the White House, Arlington, Monticello, the Library of Congress, the Treasury, the Supreme Court, the Smithsonian, the Lincoln Memorial, the Washington Monument and the reflecting pool between. All gone. All rubble. Stomped into the earth by a ruthless army; its treasures looted, with millions dead and nearly a million sold into slavery.

“I will not leave you orphaned. I am coming to you. Those who love me will keep my word, and my Father will love them, and we will come to them and make our home with them.” The God who is the protector of orphans and widows will come to this orphaned people. The God who dwelt in the temple will now dwell in this small band of students dwelling in Jesus’ word.

It is as though the Declaration of Independence survived and is now in the hands of one small band.

If we had experienced all this, we would not take up the Gospel like an imperial banner under which to conquer the world. We would be a community that washes feet. That welcomes the stranger. That loves one another. We would be a community that witnesses tears turned to joy like water to wine. We would be a community where eyes are opened and lives are healed. We would be a community that breathes the Spirit of God.

 

Photocredit: dkbonde

All Nations

File:Victoria, BC - Christ Church Cathedral - stained glass 28 - Chapel of the New Jerusalem (20623905782).jpg

Chapel of the New Jerusalem, Christ Church Cathedral, Victoria, BC

Watching for the Morning of May 1, 2016

Year C

The Sixth Sunday of Easter

It is still Easter. It will be Easter forever, but this is still the Easter season, and the empty tomb, and the New Jerusalem, and the Lamb upon the throne, and the river of life, and the gathering of all creation, continues to vibrate through our readings and song.

Paul and his companions have set out on their second missionary journey, visiting congregations they have planted and hoping to go into new regions. But the door is continually blocked until they find themselves in the port city of Troas and a vision leads them across the Aegean Sea to Macedonia and Greece and the ancient heart of Greek culture. There, across the sea, in the Roman colony of Philippi, the planted word takes root, beginning with Lydia and growing into Paul’s most beloved congregation.

The psalmist calls all nations and peoples to the ends of the earth to join the praise of God. John of Patmos sees the holy city, a light on a hill, beckoning all peoples. From the throne of God flows the river of the water of life and the tree of life brings healing to the nations. And then Jesus speaks to his followers of the gift of the Spirit, the advocate/defender who will stand with us and call to mind all that Jesus has said. The new creation dawns, and the peace of God is given.

The Prayer for May 1, 2016

God of might and tenderness,
who makes the mountain shake
but breaks not the bruised reed
and sustains the flickering flame.
Help us to dwell in your peace,
and ever to take refuge in the Holy Spirit
whom you have sent as our advocate and defender,
our teacher and guide.

The Texts for May 1, 2016

First Reading: Acts 16:6-15 (appointed: vv. 9-15)
“During the night Paul had a vision: there stood a man of Macedonia pleading with him and saying, “Come over to Macedonia and help us.” – On his second missionary journey, the plans of Paul and his companions are blocked until they find themselves in the port city of Troas where Paul’s vision leads them across the Aegean to Philippi are received by Lydia.

Psalmody: Psalm 67
“May God be gracious to us and bless us and make his face to shine upon us, that your way may be known upon earth, your saving power among all nations.” – A harvest song calling upon all nations to praise God

Second Reading: Revelation 21:9-10; 21:22 – 22:5 (appointed: vv. 21:10; 21:22 – 22:5)
“And the city has no need of sun or moon to shine on it, for the glory of God is its light, and its lamp is the Lamb. The nations will walk by its light, and the kings of the earth will bring their glory into it.”
– In this culminating vision of the Book of Revelation of all things made new and the heavenly Jerusalem coming to dwell on earth, the prophet sees a city that is a beckoning light to all people and the tree of life brings healing to the nations.

Gospel: John 14:18-19, 23-29 (appointed: vv. 23-29)
“I have said these things to you while I am still with you. But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all that I have said to you.” – On the night of the last Supper, Jesus declares that he will not abandon his followers, but will send the Spirit to be their guide and defender.

 

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AVictoria%2C_BC_-_Christ_Church_Cathedral_-_stained_glass_28_-_Chapel_of_the_New_Jerusalem_(20623905782).jpg  by Joe Mabel [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0), CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Orphaned

Wednesday

John 14

File:Baby squirrel (orphaned male) sleeping in human hand.jpg18“I will not leave you orphaned; I am coming to you.

‘Orphaned’ doesn’t seem to have quite the same emotional impact as ‘fatherless’. Maybe it’s my generation. Maybe it’s my own story. My brother was my surrogate father. Almost five years older, he was the one I looked to for connection, guidance, companionship. His were the footsteps I followed. I saw my real father holidays and summers; I loved him deeply. I love him deeply. But when I was small, the day to day fathering (and some bullying) came from Ken.

And then he died.

A brain aneurism a month before he turned 23. I was just 18, leaving home for college. Suddenly I felt like I was falling down stairs without walls or handrails. There was no guide. No listener. No one to say, “I remember when that happened to me.” No one to make all these new experiences normal. So I was alone, not only physically, away at school, but facing the future without any guide but one last letter, mailed the day before he died.

I cannot imagine the devastation of the cross for the followers of Jesus. Neither can I imagine the anxiety among John’s community as their teacher neared his end. He was an original witness. He had been their guide and teacher and leader for 50 years. How would they survive without him? What would hold them together? Who would keep them in the faith?

So John’s account of Jesus speaks not just of that time, long ago, when John received from Jesus the care of his mother. John’s account speaks of his own time as his final days draw near. And the word of Jesus he places before his community is this simple promise: “I will not leave you fatherless.”

“I am coming to you.” John puts the phrase in the present tense. Jesus is coming to us. It is his nature to come. Just as it is God’s nature to come. It is God’s nature to seek the lost, to gather the scattered, to bind up the wounded, to lead us to good pasture, to bring us into Life – to bring the whole creation to Life.

“I am coming to you.” Not just in scattered resurrection appearances, but in the Holy Spirit. In the abiding presence of the Father. In his own abiding presence in the community. In the bread and wine and word. In the love that he commanded.

“I am coming to you.” Again and again he comes, calling to mind all that he has said, reminding us of his promise, renewing in us his grace, summoning us into lives of witness and service.

Last words are things of power. I know how I clung to my brother’s last words. I know how his letter shaped me consciously and unconsciously. It led my path, ultimately to seminary and to the inner city.

And these last words of Jesus are words of power. Words that sustain. Words that comfort. Words that empower. Words that call forth the love he commanded. We are not orphaned. He is with us.

I am coming to you

Watching for the morning of May 25

Year A

The Sixth Sunday of EasterGolden Gate Bridge at night.lg

It is still Easter, though we draw near to the liturgical celebration of the ascension – 40 days after Easter according to Luke. Luke likes nice, tidy, maps. 40 days for the risen Jesus to appear (the counterpoint to 40 days in the wilderness at the beginning of the Gospel). Then 10 days of waiting and preparing for the promised Spirit on that 50th day when Luke has 120 believers together in Jerusalem and the roar of a mighty wind/breath/spirit summons God’s people to hear the mighty works of God.

But for John there are no such nice schemas; for John it is all part of the same drama. Jesus is the living presence of the Father. And the Spirit is the living presence of Jesus. And the Spirit is the living presence of the Father. The Father abides in the Son and the Son in the Father and the students of Jesus abide in Jesus and in the Father and in the Spirit who comes from the Father (at the Son’s request) as their advocate. There is a reason we end up with a doctrine of the Trinity. Though John is not talking about doctrine; he is talking about the living presence of God among this band who are now Children of God, abiders in the heavenly grace, appointed bearers of the divine mercy: “As the Father sent me, so I send you.”

And so John tells us that Jesus breathed his Spirit on his followers on Easter Evening, because Easter and Ascension and Pentecost are all part of the same new reality. Jesus says, in Sunday’s Gospel, “I am coming to you.” And the promise is answered by the resurrection (he returns to speak and eat with them) and by the Ascension (he tells Mary not to hold him until he has ascended to the Father, which has happened by that first Easter Evening when he invites the disciples to touch his wounds) and by the coming of the Spirit (on that first Easter evening when he breathes upon them his breath/spirit/life).

We are not alone. He has come. And is coming. Continually he comes. In the Spirit to comfort and empower. In the word and in the meal. He cooks breakfast on the Galilean shore, and his brief conversation with Peter pulls him once more away from their nets. The risen Jesus feeds us and suddenly there are ‘missionaries’ all over the world. Witnesses. Speakers of the word that frees. “If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven.”

It is still Easter. But John knows it is also Pentecost. And for that matter it is Christmas and Epiphany, for the light and life of God is present in the world.

And we are sent.

The Prayer for May 25, 2014

Gracious God,
you have given us your Spirit as our advocate and guide
that we might abide in you and you in us.
Grant us courage and faith to follow where you lead,
to obey your commands,
to love as you love;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for May 25, 2014

First Reading: Acts 17:22-31
“Paul stood in front of the Areopagus and said, ‘Athenians, I see how extremely religious you are in every way.’” – Paul, traveling by himself to avoid a conspiracy to murder him, comes to Athens where he seeks to engage the leaders of that city with the message of God, the creator all peoples.

Psalmody: Psalm 66:8-20
“Bless our God, O peoples, let the sound of his praise be heard.” – The psalmist calls for all nations to praise God for his gracious deeds to deliver those in need.

Second Reading: 1 Peter 3:13-22
“For Christ also suffered for sins once for all, the righteous for the unrighteous, in order to bring you to God.” –
The author’s continuing exposition on baptism, now touches on the Ascension: “Baptism…now saves you–not as a removal of dirt from the body, but as an appeal to God for a good conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ, who has gone into heaven and is at the right hand of God, with angels, authorities, and powers made subject to him.”

Gospel: John 14: 15-21
“If you love me, you will keep my commandments. And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Advocate, to be with you forever.” – Continuing last Sunday’s reading, Jesus makes provision for his followers in light of his impending death, promising that God will send the Holy Spirit (the ‘Paraclete’).

 

A place for me

Friday

John 14

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Mother and Child (A Goodnight Hug), Mary Cassatt, 1880

2In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you?

There are no periods or question marks in the ancient Greek texts – and this is one of the places where it matters. Does Jesus say, “In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you?” Or “In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you…”

There are no great doctrinal consequences to the two possible translations, but personally I like the latter. The first one sounds a little snotty to me; the second calm and firm.

I don’t like it when people ask me ambiguous or loaded questions like “Would I have done that?” I like the clear assurance of “I wouldn’t have done that.” The truth is uncertain in the first, but not in the second.

I never liked it when Mother asked, “What were you thinking?” It wasn’t really a question; it was an accusation. There was no point in explaining what I was thinking – it was obviously wrong or stupid or (and this is what I think she really meant) I wasn’t thinking at all.

A friend carried into adulthood the shame from being accused of trying to take money out of that little plastic receptacle for Muscular Dystrophy donations that used to stand by the cash register hoping for your change. She wasn’t trying to get the money; she was just curious if she could touch it. How deep was that thing? How full was it? It was a pretty natural thought for a small child. But no one was really interested in what she was thinking – they all thought they knew. It was a sad scar to carry. A scar like those many of us carry.

Jesus has no problems being blunt. I don’t think he has to resort to being snide. So, for me, this text will always be a simple declaration. “I would have told you.”

With those little words I hear him say to me “I don’t play games with you. I wouldn’t mislead you. I would have told you.” With those little words he reminds me once again that everything he says to me can be trusted – including, that he has prepared a place for me in the heart of the father.

And a place in me for the Father.

 

Bearing Christ into the world

Watching for the morning of May 18

Year A

The Fifth Sunday of Easter

File:Daniel dela Cruz.jpg

Daniel de la Cruz with his sculpture Hari ng mga Hari (king of kings) from his exhibit Parangal: A Tribute to Christ Our Savior

Past the midpoint of the Easter season, our attention begins to turn from the resurrection appearances towards Pentecost. The one who was raised is the one who abides with us, who gives us his Spirit, who manifests himself to the world through us.

In the first reading this Sunday we hear Stephen’s last words as Luke (the author of Luke-Acts) brings Paul on stage as a participant in the outbreak of communal violence against the incipient Christian movement. The book of Acts – volume 2 of Luke’s narrative about Jesus – shows the ongoing words and deeds of Jesus through the Christian community. In his death, Stephen embodies Christ. He prays for his murderers and, as the crucified Jesus remained faithful to the end entrusting himself into the hands of God using the words of Psalm 31, so Stephen entrusts himself to God. The crucified and risen one is present in his followers.

This theme of Jesus present to the world through the community is seen also in the reading from 1 Peter. The author reminds us that we are a part of God’s holy temple, the place of God’s encounter with the world. We are a “chosen race” sent to proclaim the wondrous work of God.

Sunday’s Gospel takes us to the “farewell discourses” in John where, in light of his impending death, Jesus makes provision for his followers and tells them what is to come. Jesus will continue to be present with them. They will have the same access to the Father as Jesus – indeed the community will do what Jesus has done, bearing into the world the bountiful gifts of God.

(Click here for images from Parangal)

The Prayer for May 18, 2014

Let not our hearts be troubled, O God;
teach us to put our hope and trust in you.
Guide us in your way;
keep us in your truth;
enfold us in your life
that your works of love, justice and mercy
may be done in us and through us;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

 The Texts for May 18, 2014

First Reading: Acts 7:55-60
“While they were stoning Stephen, he prayed, ‘Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.’ Then he knelt down and cried out in a loud voice, ‘Lord, do not hold this sin against them.’” – Stephen becomes a victim of communal violence for his preaching and teaching about Jesus, and in his dying embodies the faith and love Jesus modeled.

Psalmody: Psalm 31:1-5
“Into your hand I commit my spirit; you have redeemed me, O Lord, faithful God.” – A prayer of lament. The trust in God embodied in the psalm is reflected in Stephen and quoted by Jesus on the cross.

Second Reading: 1 Peter 2:2-10
“You are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, God’s own people, in order that you may proclaim the mighty acts of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light.” –
Expounding on baptism, the author urges the believers to “grow into salvation” as living stones in a “spiritual house” (a spiritual temple).

Gospel: John 14:1-14
“Do not let your hearts be troubled. Believe in God, believe also in me.” – Jesus makes provision for his followers in lieu of his impending death, urging them to remain faithful and assuring them that God’s resources are more than adequate to provide all their needs.