A Journey towards God

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From last Sunday

The First Sunday of Advent, 2018, Year C

The children were given binoculars on Sunday – as we look on this Sunday to the horizon of history. The theme for the day was “A Journey towards God,” and the texts for Sunday can be found with the post: “The season of hope.” These are a few passages from the day’s sermon. The full message can be found here.

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When we describe this first Sunday in Advent as being about our Journey towards God, we aren’t just talking about my individual spiritual journey, but the journey of the whole world to its re-creation.

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We are moving towards a creation made new. We are moving towards the day when the Spirit of God reigns in every heart. This means we are fundamentally and profoundly people of hope. We don’t look on the sorrows of the world around us with despair. We don’t lay our dead in the ground imagining this is the end. We don’t see the triumph of lies and deceptions and hate as the end of civilization.   It may be the end of our civilization, but it is not the end of God’s work with the world. It’s not the end of the human story.

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What is present to us in Jesus is a new birth of the world. And the followers of Jesus are the messengers of Jesus carrying that new birth to the world.

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We are not waiting with dark pleasure at the thought that the wicked are finally going to get their due. We are rejoicing in the rebirth and transformation of the world. We are sowing the seeds of mercy and light. We are living our reconciliation. We are bearing witness to the mercy of God. We are bold in the face of death, for death has lost its sting. We belong to God. The world belongs to God. And we are headed toward life. Even if it were possible for heaven and earth to pass away, says Jesus, his promise will not pass away.

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The shaking of the powers of the heavens doesn’t mean literal changes to the physical universe – the reference is to the governing powers that oppress human life. The powers that are shaken are hate and fear and racism. The powers that are shaken are tribalism, greed and falsehood. The powers that are shaken are all the tyrants that rule – because a new king is coming: one who reigns in justice and righteousness, one who fills all creation with faithfulness to God and one another, one who sets right the world.

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Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2014041_465556_21255545_161244.jpg Suvendra.nath [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, from Wikimedia Commons

The world’s first breath and final sigh:

The promise of peace

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Watching for the Morning of November 27, 2016

Year A

The First Sunday of Advent

We start the Advent season by talking about Christ’s advent at the end of the age. I used to say “the end of time”, but it is not the end of time; it is the end of this time. It is the end of the world we know where bombs rain on hospitals and people still wave flags emboldened with the sign of the most hateful reign in human experience. But it’s not the end of this wondrous creation. Even the brutal travail of the world described in Revelation is not the end of the creation but its transformation, its healing, its redemption. There may be no need for sun and moon because of the radiance of God’s presence, and the author may proclaim that the sea is no more – meaning that there is no longer in this world any remnant of the primal chaos (the source of the beastly kingdoms described in Daniel’s visions) – but the point is that God has come to dwell with us and the city gates no need ever be closed. The violence that mars the creation, the rebellion begun in the garden that reaches cosmic dimensions in the imagery of the book of Revelation, is over. Humanity that was once clothed in animal skins is now robed in white. The river of life flows from the city, and the tree of life from which humanity was barred lest we live eternally in our sorrows, now feeds us with fresh fruit blossoming each month. The end of which Jesus speaks is not the end but the new beginning of a world made whole, a world born from above, a world born anew.

This season of Advent begins with our eyes on the end of the age because the child whose birth we wait to celebrate at Christmas is the Lord who was and is and is to come, the world’s first breath and final sigh. He is our peace.

And so this Sunday we will read from Isaiah the promise of swords beaten into plowshares, when the world is taught by God and “nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war any more.” And we will hear Paul declare that “the night is far gone, the day is near.” And we will hear Jesus summon us to “be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour.” The armies of the world march and train in constant readiness for war, but we prepare for peace.

The Prayer for November 27, 2016

Gracious God, who called forth the first morning of the world
and brings all things to their final end when all night is vanquished,
make us ever mindful of our journey homeward
and wake us to your presence among us,
that the day when swords are beaten into plowshares
may be alive in us now;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, now and forever.

The Texts for November 27, 2016

First Reading: Isaiah 2:1-5
“They shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks.”
– In the midst of the wars and destructions as the Assyrian empire rises and crushes the kingdoms around Judah, Isaiah proclaims God’s ultimate rule: all nations will recognize and come to Zion to learn the ways of God.

Psalmody: Isaiah 51:4-11
“The heavens will vanish like smoke… but my salvation will be forever, and my deliverance will never be ended.” – In place of the appointed Psalm 122, we sing the song of salvation from Isaiah 51. The prophet declares that even if they heavens could vanish, God’s faithfulness will not, and heralds the return from exile in “everlasting joy.”

Second Reading: Romans 13:11-14
“You know what time it is, how it is now the moment for you to wake from sleep … the night is far gone, the day is near.” –
Living in the confidence of Christ’s return and the full dawning of God’s reign of life, Paul exhorts the community to “lay aside the works of darkness and put on the armor of light”.

Gospel: Matthew 24:36-44
“Keep awake therefore, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming.”
– Having spoken of the fall of Jerusalem and warned his followers about the troubles and persecutions they will face in the days to come – and particularly of the false messiahs who will claim that the Day of the Lord has come (in their violent revolt against Rome) – Jesus assures them that though the final day is unknown, they will not miss it when it comes. In the face of the challenges to come they are to be ever awake and attending to the work of God.

 

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AMist_-_Ensay_region3.jpg By benjamint444 (Digital Camera) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons