Partners in the song

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Watching for the Morning of October 1, 2017

The Commemoration of St. Francis and The Blessing of the Animals

On this first Sunday of October, nearest to the feast day of St. Francis, our parish celebrates the blessing of the animals. The readings for the day are chosen around that theme. Follow this link for a comment on the regularly appointed texts for this Sunday. Other comments/reflections can be found for by following this link, Proper 21 A / Lectionary 26 A.

File:Meerkat (Suricata suricatta) Tswalu.jpgThere are hundreds of glorious pictures to choose from when you begin to look: the creation is stunning in its variety and splendor. The creatures with whom we share this awesome world are wondrous in their diversity, beauty, majesty – and, sometimes – strangeness. It seems impossible for a picture of meerkats not to make you smile. Fawns of any kind evoke tenderness. In its familiarity, we forget how strange is an elephant’s nose. Butterflies seem such an ephemeral beauty – yet monarchs migrate thousands of miles. Whales, chipmunks, water buffalo, and the myriad things that squirm and make us squirm – it is an amazing world.

File:Giant sequoias in Sequoia National Park 2013.jpgStand beneath redwoods or giant sequoias. Let yourself be cradled in the arms of an oak. Walk among aspens. Ponder the tiniest alpine flowers. Consider the myriad forms of things that grow. Some we love – pears and peaches and fresh corn.   But then there are nettles and poison oak. And there are mosquitos, wondrous in their form but irritating and sometimes dangerous in what they carry.

Horned toads. Penguins. Emu. Fox. The strange things hidden deep in the sea. The microflora in our gut. The world is bursting with life.

File:Caesio teres in Fiji by Nick Hobgood.jpgEven beasts as terrifying as the great white shark are wondrous and beautiful.

Walking to and from the office on suburban streets past rose bushes, decorative trees and chirping birds, amidst all the distractions of tasks to be done and routines followed, it is possible to forget the wonder and mystery of the natural world. We don’t stand in awe of night skies; we cannot see them. We don’t search the horizon hoping for rain and fearing hail, knowing our lives are dependent on the fragile green stalks turning into bursting clusters of grain. We fear no beasts in the night. We see little of the beauty of the sunrise or sunset.

File:Väimela Mäejärv 2011 09.jpgSomething is lost in our relationship not only with the natural world around us, but with the divine. There is a taste of the holy in the beauty of the world. There is a shudder of the holy in the power of its storms. The enduring faithfulness of God is whispered by the pattern of the seasons and the enduring hills. The tenderness of God is witnessed in the care of songbirds for File:Gavia immer1 BS.jpgtheir chicks. Watching the small screen on our cell phones we lose track of the far horizon, the enduring truth that we are small and there is something greater than ourselves, the enduring truth that we must care for one another if we are to survive, the enduring truth that we must care for the land if it is to care for us.

You cannot cut down the fruit trees when you besiege a city, says Deuteronomy, and it is not legislation but vision: Are the trees men that you should make war on them?” You can take the eggs from a nest, but not the hen that lays them. You must give thought for the future. The Sabbath law applies even to animals. We must care for the world around if we are to know life’s goodness. We must care for one another. We must become partners in the song of all creation.File:Butterfly Green-underside Blue - Glaucopsyche alexis 01.jpg

The Prayer for October 1, 2017

Gracious God, from whom and for whom all things exist:
In the wonder of the creation you bear witness to your majesty and grace.
All things proclaim your praise.
Grant us wisdom and courage
to tend with faithfulness all that you have entrusted into our care
and to lift our lives to you in thankfulness and praise;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

The Texts for October 1, 2017, Blessing of the Animals

First Reading: Psalm 104
“O Lord, how manifold are your works! In wisdom you have made them all.” – The psalmist sings of the wonder of the created world and summons us to recognize their the majesty and goodness of God.

Second Reading: Colossians 1:15-20
“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation; 16for in him all things in heaven and on earth were created.” – In the opening verses of this letter the author sings of the mystery of Christ Jesus as the truth at the heart of all existence and its ultimate goal.

Gospel: John 1:1-4
“In the beginning was the Word…All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being.” – The opening of John’s Gospel sees in Christ Jesus the embodiment of the Word that called all things into existence and speaks life to the world.

Images:
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ALotus_flower_(978659).jpg By Hong Zhang (jennyzhh2008) [CC0 or CC0], via Wikimedia Commons
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AMeerkat_(Suricata_suricatta)_Tswalu.jpg By Charlesjsharp (Own work, from Sharp Photography, sharpphotography) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AGiant_sequoias_in_Sequoia_National_Park_2013.jpg By Tuxyso (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AV%C3%A4imela_M%C3%A4ej%C3%A4rv_2011_09.jpg By Vaido Otsar (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AGavia_immer1_BS.jpg By Cephas (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AButterfly_Green-underside_Blue_-_Glaucopsyche_alexis_01.jpg By Zeynel Cebeci (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

In the most unexpected places

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Watching for the Morning of November 20, 2016

Year C

Christ the King / Reign of Christ
Proper 29 / Lectionary 34

Sunday is climax of the church year. What began twelve months ago with a look to the horizon of human history sees that horizon again on Sunday in the royal pardon of a crucified man. The one we await as Lord of All is present in the brokenness of the cross, dispensing mercy and grace. It is the oddity at the heart of Christian faith: honor hidden in shame, glory hidden in lowliness, truth hidden in rejection, triumph hidden in defeat, life hidden in death. God shows up in the most unexpected places.

The more we ponder this strange, incomprehensible truth, the more we discover its depths. The thief on the cross is not deserving of mercy, but he receives it. We want to find him meritorious for his defense of Jesus, for his allegiance, his faith and trust. But he speaks the truth when he declares that he and his compatriot are condemned justly. He is not innocent. He is not deserving. Yet he sees a man dying and glimpses a transcendent truth: this is the face of God. Not wrath. Not vengeance. Not heaven’s roar against a world become vile. But mercy, compassion, fidelity, redemption. In a world where hate seems triumphant, a man of hate pledges himself to the king of peace.

This Sunday, established in the 1920’s in response to the rise of fascism, communism and ideologies claiming our allegiance, continues to speak to a world forever caught up in the conflict of powers wreaking division and death, reminding us that our lives belong only to this king: the crucified who lives. We will hear the words of Jeremiah about the shepherds of this world who destroy and scatter the flock in their care – and the promise of a new shepherd, a new king, who will reign in faithfulness. And we will hear the psalmist sing of the one who makes wars to cease to the end of the earth. And we will hear the author of Colossians sing that we have been rescued from the power of darkness and transferred into the kingdom of his beloved Son. And we will hear the king speak mercy to the thief, to us, to all.

It will be paradise.

The Prayer for November 20, 2016

O God who reigns as Lord of all,
creating and sustaining the universe,
and drawing all things to your eternal embrace,
pour out upon us your Holy Spirit,
that pondering the mystery of the cross and resurrection of your Son, Jesus,
we may be met by him who is our true Lord and King;
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.

The Texts for November 20, 2016

First Reading: Jeremiah 23:1-6
“Woe to the shepherds
who destroy and scatter the sheep of my pasture!” – As the nation spirals towards destruction by rebelling against Babylon, God speaks a word of judgment upon the leaders of the people and declares that he will gather his scattered people and give them a righteous king of the house of David.

Psalmody: Psalm 46
“God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble… He makes wars cease to the end of the earth.” – A hymn celebrating the reign of God who overcomes the chaotic forces of nature and the warring tumult of human history.

Second Reading: Colossians 1:11-20
“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation; for in him all things in heaven and on earth were created, things visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or power.” –
Christ is the ‘image’, the living sign and presence of God’s reign. We have been reclaimed from the death’s dominion and brought under the reign of Christ in whom and for whom all things exist.

Gospel: Luke 23:33-43
“One of the criminals
who were hanged there…said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.” – Jesus crucified is degraded by the governing elite as powerless to save, but one of those crucified with him puts his faith in him.”

 

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ACristo_de_Guadix_123.JPG  By No machine-readable author provided. Aguijarroo assumed (based on copyright claims). [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A holy revolution

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Ruby Bridges being escorted by U. S. Marshals to and from school.

Watching for the Morning of July 17, 2016

Year C

The Ninth Sunday after Pentecost:
Proper 11 / Lectionary 16

Sunday we have before us the story of Mary and Martha – Martha, the older sister, hosting Jesus, working to prepare the meal, and Mary sitting at Jesus’ feet, listening to the teacher.

It’s hard for us to appreciate the drama of this narrative. The family dynamics are too familiar: one overachieving, hyper-responsible sibling and one willing to go along for the ride. And so we hear a tale of family tension in which Jesus tries to calm Martha down. “Take a deep breath, Martha. The dinner doesn’t have to be perfect. Come enjoy the company.” Only it’s not that. It’s something far more profound. Imagine this is taking place in Pakistan where Malala Yousafzai – while riding a school bus – is shot by the Taliban for saying that girls should be able to go to school.

Sitting at Jesus’ feet means placing herself in the role of a disciple, a student. There is a reason we imagine the Jesus traveling the countryside with twelve men. They were acting in the public sphere. Women ruled in the private sphere, in the home, behind the walls, beneath a veil. But Mary has taken a seat.

She is Ruby Bridges with Barbara Henry, the only teacher at William Frantz Elementary School in Louisiana willing to teach a black child. She is James Meredith enrolling at the University of Mississippi. She is Ernest Green, Elizabeth Eckford, Jefferson Thomas, Terrence Roberts, Carlotta Walls LaNier, Minnijean Brown, Gloria Ray Karlmark, Thelma Mothershed, and Melba Pattillo Beals walking into Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas.

She doesn’t know her place. Tell her, Jesus. Tell her to go back to her place.

But Jesus tells her she has chosen the good thing.

What is happening in Jesus is the dawning of God’s kingdom, the profound transformation of human existence. As we read in Colossians last week, He has rescued us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of his beloved Son.

The age to come is invading this old age, breaking down the walls, tearing down the barriers, transforming relationships, healing wounds, reconciling all people, recreating the world.

The world about us continues to shoot and kill and rant and rave. The world continues to drop barrel bombs and plunder the poor. But the form of this world is passing away. A new kingdom is coming. A new reign. A new reality. A new creation.

And we are its first fruits.

And we are its witnesses.

And we are its students. All of us.

As many of you as were baptized into Christ have clothed yourselves with Christ. There is no longer Jew or Greek, there is no longer slave or free, there is no longer male and female; for all of you are one in Christ Jesus.

And so we listen this Sunday to the story of Mary and Martha. And we hear Colossians exult in the work of Christ. And we sing the psalm that asks who is worthy to enter the temple – and then talks not about purity but justice and compassion. And behind it all is the promise to Abraham and Sarah of a son – a promise beyond all hope – a promise that makes Sarah laugh – but a promise that is fulfilled nevertheless.

We are witnesses. We are guests at the banquet. We are participants into the new creation. We are sitting at the feet of Jesus.

The Prayer for July 17, 2016

Gracious God,
with courage and boldness
Mary dared to sit at Jesus’ feet as a disciple
and he defended her choice.
Give us hearts that yearn to hear your word
and, amid all the distractions of life,
help us see what is needful
and follow in your paths;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

The Texts for July 17, 2016

First Reading: Genesis 18:1-15 (appointed: 1-10a)
“The Lord appeared to Abraham by the oaks of Mamre, as he sat at the entrance of his tent in the heat of the day.”
– At the Oaks of Mamre, Abraham and Sarah host three visitors, and God announces that the time for the fulfillment of the promise of a son is at hand.

Psalmody: Psalm 15
“O Lord, who may abide in your tent? Who may dwell on your holy hill?” – The poet speaks of the qualities required of those who enter the sacred precincts to offer their sacrifices.

Second Reading: Colossians 1:15-28
“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation.” – The opening section of the letter continues, acclaiming Christ as the source and goal of all things

Gospel: Luke 10:38-42
“Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to do all the work by myself?”
– Invited to dine at the home of Martha, Jesus defends her sister Mary’s decision to sit at his feet as a disciple.

 

Image: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AUS_Marshals_with_Young_Ruby_Bridges_on_School_Steps.jpg By Uncredited DOJ photographer (Via [1]) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

A holy revolution

File:Paris - Jardin des Tuileries - PA00085992 - 106.jpg

Watching for the Morning of July 10, 2016

Year C

The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost:
Proper 10 / Lectionary 15

Jesus is a revolutionary; he turns things around. He turns us around. And if we don’t like the political associations of that word, the “religious” synonym is repentance. Only Biblical repentance isn’t about moral regret. It is about changing directions. Turning around. Jesus is a revolutionary, bent on turning us around, bent on turning the world around.

The encounter with Jesus in this reading for Sunday starts as an attack by an expert in the interpretation and application of God’s law. Maybe it’s a personal attempt to make himself look good in the eyes of the crowd by upstaging this peasant healer. Maybe he wants to tear Jesus down as a potential threat to the established order. Either way, his question is intended to show that Jesus doesn’t know the scriptures or understand the tradition. But Jesus is a revolutionary; he turns the tables on the expert, showing that this “expert” knows all the right words and nothing of their significance.

The story Jesus tells is full of shock and awe. The Samaritan is an unexpected character in the story and he behaves in a startling way. Since the wounded man is stripped and beaten, the Samaritan cannot know whether he is “one of ours” or “one of theirs”. The touch of a Samaritan, his wine and oil, are all unclean to a Judean, as likely to elicit rage as gratitude.

The expert knows the answer to the question “Who is my neighbor?” A neighbor is a fellow Israelite. This expert is not looking for information; he is scrambling to save face, hoping still to show Jesus as ignorant. But Jesus is a revolutionary; he turns the question around from “Who is my neighbor?” to “Who showed himself to be a neighbor?” Now we are not talking about who the other person is, but “Who am I?”

What does it mean to be God’s people? What does it mean to be a citizen of God’s reign? What does it mean to be a human being, created in the image of God?

A Samaritan! A hated Samaritan is the example of our true humanity! Our divine calling! Just like the Roman Centurion was an example of true faith! This Jesus who welcomes sinners…he is a revolutionary, bent on turning us all around.

So Sunday we will be confronted again by Jesus telling this familiar but challenging story. And we will hear the preaching of Deuteronomy call us to fidelity. And the psalmist will pray for God to teach us his paths. And the author of Colossians will pray that we may lead lives worthy of the Lord – reminding us that God has “rescued us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of his beloved Son.”  A holy revolution.

The Prayer for July 10, 2016

Lord of mercy,
who gathers up a broken world in the arms of your grace,
teach us to live as you live,
to love as your love,
and to see all people as members of a single human family;
through your Son, Jesus Christ our Lord.

The Texts for July 10, 2016

First Reading: Deuteronomy 30:1-14 (appointed: 9-14)
“Surely, this commandment that I am commanding you today is not too hard for you” –
To a people who have experienced the trauma of exile comes the promise of restoration and renewal and the exhortation to “turn to the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul.”

Psalmody: Psalm 25:1-10
“Make me to know your ways, O Lord; teach me your paths” – A prayer of faith for God’s continuing mercy, protection and guidance.

Second Reading: Colossians 1:1-14
“We have not ceased praying for you and asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of God’s will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so that you may lead lives worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, as you bear fruit in every good work and as you grow in the knowledge of God.” – The salutation and blessing at the beginning of the letter to the Colossians that anticipate the central concerns of the letter.

Gospel: Luke 10:25-37
“But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbor?’”
– Jesus answers a lawyer’s challenge with the story we know as the parable of the Good Samaritan.

 

Photo: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AParis_-_Jardin_des_Tuileries_-_PA00085992_-_106.jpg By Thesupermat (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

More than rules

Friday

Colossians 1

God the Father 11

God the Father 11 (Photo credit: Waiting For The Word)

9For this reason, since the day we heard it, we have not ceased praying for you and asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of God’s will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, 10so that you may lead lives worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, as you bear fruit in every good work and as you grow in the knowledge of God.

“The knowledge of God’s will.”  My will for my daughters and the rules we had in our household are two different things.  My “will” was that they be honest, responsible, compassionate and cooperative.  The rules were specific things that seemed appropriate in order to help them be honest, responsible, compassionate and cooperative.  But the rules are not the point.  I would not be pleased with a child who was home by curfew, cleaned her room, and always had her homework done if she were also manipulative, deceitful or cruel.  God’s will is more than rules.

Paul doesn’t pray that the believers in Colossae will know God’s rules; he prays they will understand God’s will.  The legal materials in the Old Testament are not simply social mores of a forgotten time, nor are they timeless requirements of the divine will; they are attempts to give insight into the will of God for our existence.  It is not enough to observe the rule about only taking the eggs and not the hen from a nest in the field if we do not see in that law the will of God for humanity to respect and preserve the created world.  It is not enough to observe the rule that you not cut down fruit trees when laying siege to a city if you have laid waste to the cropland to punish the people with hunger long after the war is over.  It is not enough to refrain from adultery if your heart desires what belongs to another – or you fail to desire what belongs to you.

Laws are nice and neat, black and white.  And they are also open to sophisticated parsing – just exactly which neighbors do I have to treat as if they were members of my own household or clan?  Once you have asked that question, you are no longer seeking God’s will; you are seeking something else.

I appreciate the need for rules and for careful thought about their application.  But we cannot use rules as tools to control others, as tools to define “us” from “them” or “good” people from “bad,” as proof of our righteousness or the means of meriting God’s favor.  The rules are there to give us examples of what God’s will looks like.  It doesn’t mean we are free of the rules; it means we are seeking to understand and live God’s will.  We are seeking to understand God’s vision for human life – care for one another, care for the earth, care for ourselves; compassion, justice, peace; love of God and love of neighbor.

“What does the LORD require of you but to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God.” (Micah 6:8)

This is Paul’s prayer.  He has not come to Colossae to convert them from one system of religious practices to another; he has come to give them understanding of the will of the one who stands at the beginning and end of time and calls us into the fullness of our humanity.

PS The references above to provisions in the Torah are found in Deuteronomy 22:6 and 20:19

Watching for the morning of July 14

Year C

The Eighth Sunday after Pentecost:
Proper 10 / Lectionary 15

This coming Sunday we will hear the psalmist pray for God to teach him God’s way, not holding against him the folly of his youth.  The “lawyer” who comes to Jesus is not seeking God’s way.  After all, he’s an expert in the application of God’s law; he already knows what God requires.  As a friend of mine says of similar people, he’s “on the answer committee.”  This expert in the application of God’s law to the various circumstances of life comes to show off his knowledge and reveal Jesus’ ignorance.  Unfortunately for him, Jesus wins.  But Jesus is not interested in simply winning the verbal battle.  With the story of the Good Samaritan, he tries to open the heart and mind of this religious expert and call him into the way of God’s kingdom.

Whether we seek God’s truth or not, God seeks us, setting before us the path of life and bidding us to follow.

Prayer for July 14, 2013

Lord of mercy,
who gathers up a broken world
in the arms of your grace,
teach us to live as you live,
to love as your love,
and to see all people as members
of a single human family.

The Texts for July 14, 2013

First Reading: Deuteronomy 30:9-14
11Surely, this commandment that I am commanding you today is not too hard for you” – An exhortation in the mouth of Moses urging the people to abide by God’s will made known in the laws given at Sinai.

Psalmody: Psalm 25:1-10
 “Make me to know your ways, O Lord; teach me your paths” – A prayer of faith for God’s continuing mercy, protection and guidance.

Second Reading: Colossians 1:1-14
2To the saints and faithful brothers and sisters in Christ in Colossae:” –
The salutation and blessing at the beginning of the letter to the  Colossians

Gospel: Luke 10:25-37
“But wanting to justify himself, he asked Jesus, ‘And who is my neighbor?’”  – Jesus answers a lawyer’s challenge with the story we know as the parable of the Good Samaritan.